The Nine, by Jeffrey Toobin

Scroll down to content

I really like learning about US government and history — I’m a little obsessed about it sometimes, really. For all the problems, I have incredible admiration for the broad and varied group of people who contributed to the founding and the creation and the running of our country. I have some issues with our current executive branch, of course, and our overactive executive throughout (at least) the 20th century. But I’m interested in the Supreme Court, and how tricky it’s been through history to predict how appointing a justice for life will change how they view the world and make decisions.

But this new book by Toobin is worrying — because it really brings into relief how much we’ve moved into a world where we’re appointing justices because of what they think on specific issues, not how they make decisions, or how they show their character. That’s not a new revelation, but reading this book makes me worry more than ever.

Having said that, our government has gone through tough trials even since before the Constitution, and, notably, in times of extreme stress from outside and inside both. And we’ve managed to muddle our way through. Even now, I’m optimistic, given the signs from this primary season, that we can move back to a time of cooperation and move forward to a time of post-partisanship.

4 Replies to “The Nine, by Jeffrey Toobin”

  1. I cannot believe you beat me to this book review. I read this on the plane from Boston last weekend. I will now have to play second-to-market with my blog review. :)Adam

  2. I cannot believe you beat me to this book review. I read this on the plane from Boston last weekend. I will now have to play second-to-market with my blog review. 🙂

    Adam

  3. Nothing much to add except to say that the book is a wonderful read, containing worthwhile insights into the character and ideological makeup of the 11 justices (including the departed Rehnquist and O’Connor) who have presided over the past two decades. Just this week I picked up another copy as a birthday present for my brother who is more of a Founding Fathers history buff than I am. Highly recommended.

  4. Nothing much to add except to say that the book is a wonderful read, containing worthwhile insights into the character and ideological makeup of the 11 justices (including the departed Rehnquist and O’Connor) who have presided over the past two decades. Just this week I picked up another copy as a birthday present for my brother who is more of a Founding Fathers history buff than I am. Highly recommended.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: