2 Replies to “small is the new big”

  1. small is the new big! :)i’m glad i was going through your older posts as i’m currently looking into the forces of creative destruction and how “they” come to bear on contemporary business entities…essentially whether companies should willingly split themselves up into smaller entities to position for more growth. it’s a pretty big project since i want to avoid looking like an ass, but it’s good to see that the general paradigm is shifting toward accepting the possiblity that the smaller is better. of course, as concerns internet companies, i’m not sure companies like twitter/photobucket/etc should overly rely on ad revenue as their sole source of income. it’s simply not sustainable since it’s mostly “vaporous” and extremely vulnerable to competitive forces; meaning, as soon as another, better competitor comes along the company is doa since there was no real revenue stream…goog for example has the masses supporting it now but that’s obviously not enough to sustain growth–and they know that, considering the massive amounts of functionality expansions they’ve been undergoing. cheers!

  2. small is the new big! 🙂
    i’m glad i was going through your older posts as i’m currently looking into the forces of creative destruction and how “they” come to bear on contemporary business entities…essentially whether companies should willingly split themselves up into smaller entities to position for more growth.
    it’s a pretty big project since i want to avoid looking like an ass, but it’s good to see that the general paradigm is shifting toward accepting the possiblity that the smaller is better.
    of course, as concerns internet companies, i’m not sure companies like twitter/photobucket/etc should overly rely on ad revenue as their sole source of income. it’s simply not sustainable since it’s mostly “vaporous” and extremely vulnerable to competitive forces; meaning, as soon as another, better competitor comes along the company is doa since there was no real revenue stream…goog for example has the masses supporting it now but that’s obviously not enough to sustain growth–and they know that, considering the massive amounts of functionality expansions they’ve been undergoing.
    cheers!

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