typepad

i’m finding typepad harder & harder to love lately. the web-based UI seems like it’s always slow, the photo uploading for sam’s blog is about 2 years behind anyone else, and it costs money every month to run as well. starting to think about moving, but it’s a little stickier than i want, to be honest. i’ve got about 3 years of posts in typepad now, not to mention nearly a year and a half of videos & pictures of the little guy. but it’s still just hard to stay on typepad. i’m taking a bit of time off next week; think i’m going to do the evaluation. any ideas? (and if you’ve got suggestions, would really like suggestions on how to move the mass of content that i’ve got, too.)

basic requirements, though, are this:

– want to be able to run my own blog, plus sam’s blog

– want to have a feature-rich, easy to use + gallery-ize picture capability — with easy integration to iphoto

– want to make it as easy as possible to put up video from our DV camera — videoegg currently is the easiest to do importing; it also has integration with typepad

and free would be nice. šŸ™‚

thoughts?

12 Replies to “typepad”

  1. We’ll you’ve probably already gotten this advice, but WordPress (maybe WordPress.com) might do the trick. It’s definitely the most flexible, but not free. WordPress could be a lot of work. I’ve heard some good things about Vox but haven’t played around with it that much.

  2. Oh. There’s migration support for WordPress I believe. Well, I had a MovableType blog and was able to migrate over to WordPress pretty easily. I’m guessing they have one for TypePad.

  3. We’ll you’ve probably already gotten this advice, but WordPress (maybe WordPress.com) might do the trick. It’s definitely the most flexible, but not free. WordPress could be a lot of work. I’ve heard some good things about Vox but haven’t played around with it that much.

  4. Oh. There’s migration support for WordPress I believe. Well, I had a MovableType blog and was able to migrate over to WordPress pretty easily. I’m guessing they have one for TypePad.

  5. Hi John,So I’ve been using WordPress for a while now – pretty good, great performance and data. I don’t think it gives you quite the photo & video integration ease of use you might be looking for. Personally, I’ve been getting mileage just using iPhoto & iWeb to publish content, and then using the URLs on WordPress. Makes life very easy.

  6. Hi John,

    So I’ve been using WordPress for a while now – pretty good, great performance and data. I don’t think it gives you quite the photo & video integration ease of use you might be looking for. Personally, I’ve been getting mileage just using iPhoto & iWeb to publish content, and then using the URLs on WordPress. Makes life very easy.

  7. I think with any hosted service you’re at the mercy of their bandwidth/load, so wordpress.com may not be any better than typepad.com in the long run (it may be, it may not be, you won’t be able to control it either way.I use MT on Dreamhost.com and I’m pretty happy with the speed of the host. It does require that you install MT and whatnot- PITA at first. WP is also popular and I think most hosts these days have it as an automated install. Dreamhost has a number of automated installs for customers including MediaWiki, Gallery, etc.

  8. I think with any hosted service you’re at the mercy of their bandwidth/load, so wordpress.com may not be any better than typepad.com in the long run (it may be, it may not be, you won’t be able to control it either way.

    I use MT on Dreamhost.com and I’m pretty happy with the speed of the host. It does require that you install MT and whatnot- PITA at first. WP is also popular and I think most hosts these days have it as an automated install. Dreamhost has a number of automated installs for customers including MediaWiki, Gallery, etc.

  9. Hey John, a little bit of feedback on TypePad. (Grain of salt: I work with the TypePad team and love my job.)* want to be able to run my own blog, plus sam’s blogTypePad or (maybe) Movable Type would be your best bets here. WordPress doesn’t support more than one blog, so you’d be installing another copy of the app for each blog. That feels kind of like using a browser without tabs — another instance of an app just to have multiple streams of information seems clunky.* want to have a feature-rich, easy to use + gallery-ize picture capability — with easy integration to iphotoThere’s an iPhoto uploader for TypePad, but if you want more rich photo options, including integration with Flickr, iStockPhoto, and PhotoBucket, our Vox service might be a good option. It’s free, and plugs right into TypePad.* want to make it as easy as possible to put up video from our DV camera — videoegg currently is the easiest to do importing; it also has integration with typepadSame story here — if you want additional video controls, including YouTube or iFilm integration, this stuff is built into Vox and can connect to your TypePad blog as well.And the good news, a lot of that shared technology from Vox will be making its way into TypePad in the future, as well. It seems that part of the challenge here might be that we haven’t done a good enough job of explaining the options that are available to make the whole experience better. Oh, and the TypePad team is definitely focusing on performance for the system, as well.The iPhoto to TypePad app is available for free on the web (http://www.daikini.com/), and our support team is happy to answer any of these kinds of questions, as well. Just click on “help” anywhere in TypePad to file a help ticket. A note about the WordPress recommendations — I don’t use that platform much myself, but it doesn’t support the standard import/export format that the rest of these services use, so there’s a pretty significant lock-in risk. In addition. there’s some vagueness about what kind of content you can post — things like affiliate links are verboten, and 90% or more of their widgets can’t be used on the hosted service. I’m no expert here, but these are the issues we here when people want to migrate to TypePad from WordPress.If you’re just curious about what else is out there, try out Vox. It lets you keep your investment in your TypePad blog while adding a whole new set of features, and will be working even more closely with TypePad in the future. Let me know if I can help!

  10. Hey John, a little bit of feedback on TypePad. (Grain of salt: I work with the TypePad team and love my job.)

    * want to be able to run my own blog, plus sam’s blog
    TypePad or (maybe) Movable Type would be your best bets here. WordPress doesn’t support more than one blog, so you’d be installing another copy of the app for each blog. That feels kind of like using a browser without tabs — another instance of an app just to have multiple streams of information seems clunky.

    * want to have a feature-rich, easy to use + gallery-ize picture capability — with easy integration to iphoto
    There’s an iPhoto uploader for TypePad, but if you want more rich photo options, including integration with Flickr, iStockPhoto, and PhotoBucket, our Vox service might be a good option. It’s free, and plugs right into TypePad.

    * want to make it as easy as possible to put up video from our DV camera — videoegg currently is the easiest to do importing; it also has integration with typepad

    Same story here — if you want additional video controls, including YouTube or iFilm integration, this stuff is built into Vox and can connect to your TypePad blog as well.

    And the good news, a lot of that shared technology from Vox will be making its way into TypePad in the future, as well. It seems that part of the challenge here might be that we haven’t done a good enough job of explaining the options that are available to make the whole experience better. Oh, and the TypePad team is definitely focusing on performance for the system, as well.

    The iPhoto to TypePad app is available for free on the web (http://www.daikini.com/), and our support team is happy to answer any of these kinds of questions, as well. Just click on “help” anywhere in TypePad to file a help ticket. A note about the WordPress recommendations — I don’t use that platform much myself, but it doesn’t support the standard import/export format that the rest of these services use, so there’s a pretty significant lock-in risk. In addition. there’s some vagueness about what kind of content you can post — things like affiliate links are verboten, and 90% or more of their widgets can’t be used on the hosted service. I’m no expert here, but these are the issues we here when people want to migrate to TypePad from WordPress.

    If you’re just curious about what else is out there, try out Vox. It lets you keep your investment in your TypePad blog while adding a whole new set of features, and will be working even more closely with TypePad in the future. Let me know if I can help!

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